The King is Dead… Why Was He a King?

FILE - In this photo provided by the U.S. Army on Saturday, Oct. 21, 2006, the most wanted Iraqi fugitive, former Saddam Hussein deputy Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri , is pictured on the deck of cards put out by the U.S. military to help capture most wanted officials of Saddam Hussein's regime. Salahuddin province Gov. Raed al-Jabouri says soldiers and allied Shiite militiamen killed al-Douri early Friday, April 17, 2015 in an operation east of the city of Tikrit. A graphic photo issued by the government purports to be of al-Douri's corpse, but DNA tests are still pending. (U.S. Army via AP)

King of clubs was killed several months ago. Much happened since, but it’s still worth bringing up.

An aged Saddam regime bigwig, reduced to scuttling around the dessert, planning and plotting, was killed. When the US was arrogantly stepping into the marshes and deserts of Iraq, destabilizing the entire region, this man was dubbed the King of Clubs. Gamification, a buzz word for technology over the last few years, is, like most else in the geek world, merely a dusting off of old ideas.

 

Even back in the 17th century cards were used to “pillory” people. The power of media can’t be stopped, and it can teach, inform, and corrupt. And frequently, the second and third are intertwined.

Was this man guilty of crimes? Yes. War crimes? Yes. Should have been captured and brought to justice if possible? Absolutely.

In this case, the card went to the discard pile. But it’s far easier to attack a foe when they’ve been reduced to a face in the shuffle, the object of studied scorn.